The Acting Process 1 - Casting Your Monologues

The Acting Process
(The Order of Study From Text to Performance)

Part 1 - CASTING YOUR MONOLOGUE

* CASTING. Choose Characters that:

1. Suit your playing age (eg. 12 to 16 years.)

2. Deal with emotions you can play confidently (within your current emotional range)

3. Speak in a dialect you are secure with (within your current vocal range)

4. Have at least one mood change in the speech.

Where a second piece is needed, the key word when choosing is contrast. The second piece should ideally differ in:

1. STYLE. Style means the type of language the play/monologue is written in. For example: Formal/Posh, Classical/Elizabethan or Victorian Etc, Informal/Modern, Colloquial/in an accent.

2. THEME. Theme means content. Is this a humorous play? A Melodrama? Musical Drama? Thriller? Romance? etc.

A good example of contrast would be:

PIECE ONE: A scene set in Victorian England with a servant from London who speaks angrily about the unfair treatment of her employers.

STYLE: Colloquial (London accent)

THEME: High drama with anger as the main emotion.

PIECE TWO: A scene set in modern times with a teenager telling a funny story to a friend about a day trip.

STYLE: Informal (Modern Language)

THEME: Comedy

A final consideration for contrast is TYPE. This means whether the character speaks: SOLILOQUY (Thoughts aloud to no one in particular), STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS (Disjointed thoughts spoken to Themselves), To another character, or to an audience.

Types are:

1. SOLILOQUY

2. STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS

3. UNSEEN CHARACTER

4. DIRECT ADRESS

*Only one speech of types 1, 2, or 4 is allowed for most exams and auditions. This is because it is important for the actor to show their ability to relate to (talk and listen to) another character, be able to imagine them, make them seem real, and react to them.